Memory Man by Electro-Harmonix

Electro-Harmonix Memory Man, analog delay and chorus unit, circa 1978. Silver floor unit, black lettering with on/off footswitch and 3 big knobs giving access to Blend, Feedback and Delay. Regular and boost input and single output with switch for echo/chorus mode. a/c powered. Predecessor to Deluxe model reissued last year. Fat chorus with depth and amount (wet/dry) variable thru given control knobs. Beautiful analog chorusing produces rich, floating thickness to signal and warms up any input, especially distorted tones. Great for clean signals with varying degrees of depth. Delay has real solid-state sound like a tube driven Echoplex. Nice for slapback effects. Add a touch of feedback and/or change the speed to dramatically affect the room size! Great echoing effects with longer delay times added. Best suited for only a few repeats as sound degradation is apparent. Some special effects to try include "capturing" a note and moving it's pitch up or down, with "infinite" repeats. Plus, hitting a chord in echo mode and switching mid stride over to chorus to produce a way cool rise and fall of tones. A favorite amongst EH users and certainly a 70's classic.

Sound: Wonderful echoing in the realm of tubular. PHAT chorusing rivals expensive floor units. Analog Rules!

Looks: Sturdy simple rugged silver box with little rubber feet.

Pros n cons: Noisy as hell in echo mode if the regeneration is up, often whistles like a transistor radio (you can bet Adrian Belew could get this baby to render!) Chirps when in chorus mode but bypassed. Kind of a drag (but can be omitted if you switch to echo mode). Otherwise, a perfect 2-in-1 toy for aspiring soundscapers.

Desirability: Very very high...
Uber alles: see last line of pros n cons!!

Memory Man Links:

Jackson Strat, played through a 30th Anniversary Marshall, fuzz, middle pick up

MP3's:

'64 Fender Stratocaster, played through a 30th Anniversay Marshall, crunch, neck pick up, swarbling echoes at end.

'64 Fender Stratocaster, played through a 30th Anniversary Marshall: